Posts Tagged ‘OK’

Exhaust emissions test failed: Time to Pay Your Car Repair

exhaust-mufflerNow one of the requirements of driving on city streets that passed the test of exhaust emissions. We do this so as not to pollute the environment and save fuel. However, drivers have nightmares about the costs involved in passing such a test. When this problem occurs, we must be good vehicles brought to the workshop or try to fix it yourself. The first is not a problem if you already have money set aside for this situation but what happens if you decide to do this yourself in the garage? How did you get started? What tools do you need? Where did you get the info to fix this problem?

Fix your own vehicle is a scary situation but if you bring your vehicle to a repair shop, here is what you do on the vehicle: (1). Cost scanning for diagnosis code included an hour to find the problem. $ 100- $ 150 (depending on the type of vehicle). (2). $ 100 per hour as quickly as starts mechanics working on your vehicle. The final cost can be paid from $ 300 to 800 just to fix just one problem. And assuming the mechanic find another code or sensor that can lead to failure of other smoke, which would add an extra cost.

So why not try to do it yourself? An example is shown below on how smart driver will fix his own smog problem using the check engine light on the dash panel: My Ford F150 – 2001. Take the car has failed the test the exhaust gases and this. Code P0402: EGR flow high; it is now stored in the computer of my machine. I tried to fix it myself and when I checked the vacuum to the EGR valve port at idle, the engine stops that confirmed to me that the EGR valve is OK. Engine runs fine except the check engine light is coming on all the time would fail smoke test. Is there a common fix for this code so that I could pass the test this smog?

Viewing files about this vehicle, it is indeed a common problem and here is what I say to him: There is a general improvement for this and all the times that require changes of the sensor DPFE. This sensor appears as small box with 2 ports coming from the exhaust. The sensor is located between the shutoff valve and throttle body with tubes running from it. These sensors calculate the exhaust. Back pressure when the EGR valve is activated. It’s part or tube for this sensor could be damaged and will trip the code but there is a lot of failure in self-censorship. Also, if the tubes are blocked with carbon and restrict the flow; the code can be arranged as well. To check, measure the signal voltage of the sensor as shown in the wiring diagram. Max reading should not exceed 0.9 volts or it means the sensor is broken.

As a customer, start-up costs are: the cost of obtaining a code-free and vacuum pump is about $ 20. Improvements to this end is replacement DPFE sensor. A digital voltmeter also be used which can be bought for around $ 50- $ 100. If you add the cost of other common hand tools, he might end up spending the same amount of money if he took it to the garage. However, the difference: he gained the tools and confidence, self worth, and the next time it comes around he’s ready code.